mwangazamara tent camp Kenya (2)

Explore Nature, Experience Hospitality!

games at the mara

Face 2 Face with the Big Five!

tented camp in Masai -mwangaza mara

Serenity and Comfortability.

Best accomodation in Masai Safari - Mwangaza mara

Enjoy Local and Continental Dishes

Visit the Masai Mara National Reserve - Mwangaza Mara

First hand Safari Experience

Masai Mara National Reserve

Proximity to Masai Mara Nat'l Reserve

Wildebeest Migration. Thrilling!

The Maasai Culture

maasai culture

Kenya recognizes over fifty tribes of native people. The Maasai are one of the very few tribes who have retained most of their traditions, lifestyle and lore. Unlike many other tribes in Kenya, the Maasai are semi-nomadic and pastoral: they live by herding cattle and goats.

According to their oral history, the Maasai people’s origins are in the Nile Valley region of what is now South Sudan, before they moved south around 300 years ago, conquering other tribes and living as nomadic pastoralists.

The Maasai people of East Africa live in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania along the Great Rift Valley on semi-arid and arid lands. The Maasai occupy a total land area of 160,000 square kilometers with a population of approximately one half million people.

The Maasai communities are uniquely identified by their bright red garments and their beautiful bead-work which plays an essential element in the ornamentation of the body. Young men often cover their bodies in ochre and cultivate ornate hairstyles to enhance their appearance.

The Maasai society is comprised of sixteen sections (known in Maasai as Iloshon): Ildamat, Ilpurko, Ilkeekonyokie, Iloitai, Ilkaputiei, Ilkankere, Isiria, Ilmoitanik, Iloodokilani, Iloitokitoki, Ilarusa, Ilmatatapato, Ilwuasinkishu, Kore, Parakuyu, and Ilkisonko, also known as Isikirari (Tanzania’s Maasai). There was also once Iltorobo section but was assimilated by other sections. A majority of the Maasai population lives in Kenya. Sections such as Isikirari, Parakuyu, Kore and Ilarusa lives in Tanganyika.

Homestead and labor

The Maasai live in Kraals arranged in a circular fashion. The fence around the kraal is made of acacia thorns, which prevent lions from attacking the cattle. It is a man’s responsibility to fence the kraal. While women construct the houses. Traditionally, kraals are shared by an extended family. However, due to the new land management system in the Maasai region, it is not uncommon to see a kraal occupied by a single family.

The Inkajijik (maasai word for a house) are loaf-shaped and made of mud, sticks, grass, cow dung and cow’s urine. Women are responsible for making the houses as well as supplying water, collecting firewood, milking cattle and cooking for the family. Warriors are in charge security while boys are responsible for herding livestock. During the drought season, both warriors and boys assume the responsibility for herding livestock.

Maasai Ceremonies and Rituals

There are many ceremonies in Maasai society including Enkipaata (senior boy ceremony), Emuratta (circumcision), Enkiama (marriage), Eunoto (warrior-shaving ceremony), Eokoto e-kule (milk-drinking ceremony), Enkang oo-nkiri (meat-eating ceremony), Olngesherr (junior elder ceremony), etc. Also, there are ceremonies for boys and girls minor including,Eudoto/Enkigerunoto oo-inkiyiaa (earlobe), and Ilkipirat (leg fire marks). Traditionally, boys and girls must undergo through these initiations for minors prior to circumcision. However, many of these initiations concern men while women’s initiations focus on circumcision and marriage.  Men will form age-sets moving them closer to adulthood.

Women do not have their own age-set but are recognized by that of their husbands.  Ceremonies are an expression of Maasai culture and self-determination. Every ceremony is a new life. They are rites of passage, and every Maasai child is eager to go through these vital stages of life. Following is where a boy’s life begin in the Maasai society.

The Maasai are a semi-nomadic people who lived under a communal land management system. The movement of livestock is based on seasonal rotation. Each section manages its own territory. Under normal conditions, reserve pastures are fallowed and guarded by the warriors. However, if the dry season becomes especially harsh, sections boundaries are ignored and people graze animals throughout the land until the rainy season arrives. According to Maasai traditional land agreement, no one should be denied access to natural resources such as water and land.

Information Reference: maasai-association.org